Veldman

 

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Tour de France

 Alan and Damaris at the tour in 2004
 David Veldman "participates" in 2005
 Results after stage 15 (Jul-17-05)
 Past winners of USA Male Athlete of the Year (ESPN)
 Tour de France History
 Tour de France Winners
 
 

 

Tour de Lance
In some circles it is still referred to by the original name "Tour De France"
Lance Armstrong was voted USA male athlete of the year for the third straight time for having won the tour a record six times in a row.
In the videoed acceptance speech, he commented that "I am still amazed that a guy riding a bicycle can win an award like this. Sorry I can not accept the award in person, but I am busy riding a bike in France"
Alan and Damaris Goris took these pictures last year (2004) at the prologue in Liege (Luik)
The rider on the right is Lance Armstrong
Report from David Veldman - Includes some great pictures
Added-One great shot of the winning team Discovery - Lance is in the Maillot Jeune (Yellow Jersey)
Team discovery nearing the top of Col de Madeline on the Tour.
David also climbed that mountain

July 18, 2005

REPORT FROM THE TOUR DE FRANCE

I am back in the States as of last night. I wanted to provide you with some insight to the trip I had the last 10 days to France. I have a group of friends that I have ridden bikes with for many years. We have gone together on 7 or 8 “Ride the Rockies” trips which stretch through the mountains of Colorado averaging 60-80 miles per day. We are Team Merkin. We have not been on a bike tour for a number of years so this trip to France was kind of a reunion tour. You know, like an old rock and roll band that doesn’t yet know it is all but washed up. Actually, the boys trained hard and, for the most part, we are very strong riders.

The trip was organized by Trek Travel, who is associated with Trek bicycles. This is, of course, the bike Lance Armstrong rides. Consequently, Trek had some pretty good inroads as far as positions to watch the Tour, etc.

 Our first 3 days were more or less warm ups for bigger things to come. We rode 60+ mile trips through the wine country out of Beaune. Then, we rode to Lake Annecy, and climbed the Col de Folclaz,  which is a category 1 climb. The Tour did not climb this Col this year but it was featured on last year’s tour route. Incredibly steep for the last 3 or 4 Kilometers but not a particularly long climb. The downhill was absolutely kick ass with some stretches that let us exceed 45 miles per hour. The Alps are just fantastic. I kept expecting the Von Trapps to come around a corner and sing to the tune of all the cowbells. We cooled down with a swim in Lake Annecy.

 Finally on our fourth day we rode over 2 categorized climbs and ended up in Beauford where the Tour riders were coming through. We climbed the hill out of town for 7 kilometers to find a good viewing spot. The crowds were on fire. This is like a moving Superbowl. I did not realize that there is a caravan that precedes the Tour riders by about an hour. This is a Parade of custom cars and trucks with dancing girls, stereos, etc. They throw out souvenirs and all matter of trash and trinkets. After the riders passed, we biked to Albertville to view the Tour’s finish on TV at a bar.

 Day 5 we climbed the Col de la Madeline which is an “out of category” climb that was 25 kilometers long. At the mountains top we watched the racers scream by as we yelled “Allez! Allez!”. 

 Day 6 the Tour passed through Digne-lesBains and then circled up in the hills around town and finished back in town. This gave us an opportunity for 2 good views. It just doesn’t get much better.

 A couple of fells stayed in Paris for a few days for R&R after our ride. I would tell you about it but then I would have to….well you get it.

The pre-Tour carnavale-like show
The real show - pictures include most of the top riders

Great website to follow the tour http://www.letour.com/index.html
 


After 15 stages of the 2005 Tour de France, the top 10 in the general classification is as follow:

1. Lance Armstrong (USA) DSC - 2,645.5km in 62h09’59" (42.309km/h)
2. Ivan Basso (Italy) CSC - at 2’46"
3. Mickael Rasmussen (Denmark) RAB - at 3’09"
4. Jan Ullrich (Germany) TMO - at 5’58"
5. Francisco Mancebo (Spain) IBA - at 6’31"
6. Levi Leipheimer (USA) GST - at 7’35"
7. Floyd Landis (USA) PHO - at 9’33"
8. Alexandre Vinokourov (Kazakstahn) TMO at 9’38"
9. Christophe Moreau (France) C.A - at 11’47"
10. Andreas Kloden (Germany) TMO - at 12’01"
 

 
Past winners of Male Athlete of the year

'05 Lance Armstrong
'04 Lance Armstrong
'03 Lance Armstrong
'02 Tiger Woods
'01 Tiger Woods
'00 Tiger Woods
'99 Mark McGwire
'98 Ken Griffey Jr. and Tiger Woods
'97 Michael Johnson
'96 Cal Ripken
'95 Steve Young
'94 Barry Bonds
'93 Michael Jordan
 

 

Tour de France History

Pursuit of the Yellow Jersey, or the Tour de France. The greatest bicycle tour of modern times. The original concept of a race through the country, broken into stages and based on cumulative time, has remained intact, since 1903.

The Idea: modeled after a six-day track race, Tour de France cyclists would leave the confines of a velodrome and instead loop around the entire country of France.

The Outcome: one of the greatest sporting events of the year

Tour de France - History

In 1903, the first Tour-a 2,428-kilometer affair split into six stages seemed far fetched at best, little more than a marketing coup for their sports newspaper L'Auto. The 1903 event saw 60 riders traveling 2,500 kilometers during 19 days on the basic cycle machinery of the day, with no convenient breaks for sleep. Competitors were expected to ride through the night. The 1904 Tour was almost the last one with the cheating that went on. In 1905, the stages were shortened in an effort to cut down on the long night stages. The Ballon d'Alsace was added, becoming the first major climb of the event. In 1910 the tour goes through the Pyrenees for the first time. The Tour was not held from 1915-18 because of the First World War. With the return of the Tour in 1919, the yellow jersey is used to identify the overall leader. The color yellow is chosen because it's the same color as the newspaper l'Auto, the race sponsor. Eugene Christophe of France is the first rider to ever wear the yellow jersey on July 18, 1919. In 1930 the race is reformatted with competitors organized into national teams and the Tour is opened to other advertisers. It's also the year of the first live radio broadcasts. In 1937 the use of three-speed derailleurs is allowed. No Tour during the war years of 1940-46. In 1952 and 1953 , two of the most famous climbs of the tour, the Ventoux and the Alpe-d'Huez at 1,912 meters (6272.89 feet) and 1,860 meters (6,102.288 feet) respectively, are added to the tour. In 1953, France's Louison Bobet's marks the tour's 50th anniversary with the first of three consecutive wins. In 1961 the Tour returns to sponsored teams. In 1975 the Tour de France finishes along the Champs Elysees for the first time. In 1986 Greg LeMond becomes the first American to win the tour. In 1997 Uzbekistan's Dshamolidin Abdushparov becomes the first rider to be disqualified from the tour for taking banned substances.

 

 

Tour de France winners

Tour

Year

Winner

Nationality

92

2005

-

-

91

2004

Lance Armstrong

United States

90

2003

Lance Armstrong

United States

89

2002

Lance Armstrong

United States

88

2001

Lance Armstrong

United States

87

2000

Lance Armstrong

United States

86

1999

Lance Armstrong

United States

85

1998

Marco Pantani

Italy

84

1997

Jan Ullrich

Germany

83

1996

Bjarne Riis

Denmark

82

1995

Miguel Induráin

Spain

81

1994

Miguel Induráin

Spain

80

1993

Miguel Induráin

Spain

79

1992

Miguel Induráin

Spain

78

1991

Miguel Induráin

Spain

77

1990

Greg LeMond

United States

76

1989

Greg LeMond

United States

75

1988

Pedro Delgado

Spain

74

1987

Stephen Roche

Republic of Ireland

73

1986

Greg LeMond

United States

72

1985

Bernard Hinault

France

71

1984

Laurent Fignon

France

70

1983

Laurent Fignon

France

69

1982

Bernard Hinault

France

68

1981

Bernard Hinault

France

67

1980

Joop Zoetemelk

Netherlands

66

1979

Bernard Hinault

France

65

1978

Bernard Hinault

France

64

1977

Bernard Thévenet

France

63

1976

Lucien Van Impe

Belgium

62

1975

Bernard Thévenet

France

61

1974

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

60

1973

Luis Ocaña

Spain

59

1972

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

58

1971

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

57

1970

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

56

1969

Eddy Merckx

Belgium

55

1968

Jan Janssen

Netherlands

54

1967

Roger Pingeon

France

53

1966

Lucien Aimar

France

52

1965

Felice Gimondi

Italy

51

1964

Jacques Anquetil

France

50

1963

Jacques Anquetil

France

49

1962

Jacques Anquetil

France

48

1961

Jacques Anquetil

France

47

1960

Gastone Nencini

Italy

46

1959

Federico Bahamontes

Spain

45

1958

Charly Gaul

Luxembourg

44

1957

Jacques Anquetil

France

43

1956

Roger Walkowiak

France

42

1955

Louison Bobet

France

41

1954

Louison Bobet

France

40

1953

Louison Bobet

France

39

1952

Fausto Coppi

Italy

38

1951

Hugo Koblet

Switzerland

37

1950

Ferdinand Kubler

Switzerland

36

1949

Fausto Coppi

Italy

35

1948

Gino Bartali

Italy

34

1947

Jean Robic

France

**

***

***

***

33

1939

Sylvère Maes

Belgium

32

1938

Gino Bartali

Italy

31

1937

Roger Lapébie

France

30

1936

Sylvère Maes

Belgium

29

1935

Romain Maes

Belgium

28

1934

Antonin Magne

France

27

1933

Georges Speicher

France

26

1932

André Leducq

France

25

1931

Antonin Magne

France

24

1930

André Leducq

France

23

1929

Maurice De Waele

Belgium

22

1928

Nicolas Frantz

Luxembourg

21

1927

Nicolas Frantz

Luxembourg

20

1926

Lucien Buysse

Belgium

19

1925

Ottavio Bottecchia

Italy

18

1924

Ottavio Bottecchia

Italy

17

1923

Henri Pélissier

France

16

1922

Firmin Lambot

Belgium

15

1921

Léon Scieur

Belgium

14

1920

Philippe Thys

Belgium

13

1919

Firmin Lambot

Belgium

**

***

***

***

12

1914

Philippe Thys

Belgium

11

1913

Philippe Thys

Belgium

10

1912

Odile Defraye

Belgium

09

1911

Gustave Garrigou

France

08

1910

Octave Lapize

France

07

1909

François Faber

Luxembourg

06

1908

Lucien Petit-Breton

France

05

1907

Lucien Petit-Breton

France

04

1906

René Pottier

France

03

1905

Louis Trousselier

France

02

1904

Henri Cornet

France

01

1903

Maurice Garin

France